Thursday, September 29

Tag: Perfectly Normal Productions

David Jason, Stephanie Cole & Anton Lesser for One Night Only
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David Jason, Stephanie Cole & Anton Lesser for One Night Only

Original Theatre Company, in association with Perfectly Normal Productions, is delighted to reunite David Jason, Stephanie Cole and Anton Lesser, the original stars of the BBC Radio 4 play, A Cold Supper Behind Harrods, for a one night only, semi-staged, rehearsed reading to be live streamed from the stage of the Oxford Playhouse at 7.30pm on Friday 11 June. The play, written by David Morley and originally presented on BBC Radio 4 on Friday 7 September 2012, will be directed by Philip Franks, who also directed the original radio play. Tickets are on sale now via www.originaltheatreonline.com  The performance will be followed by a Q&A with the cast and creative team. 50 years after the war that first brought them together, three Special Operations Executive agents meet once ...
Barnes’ People: A True Born Englishman – Perfectly Normal Productions
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Barnes’ People: A True Born Englishman – Perfectly Normal Productions

This is another piece written by Peter Barnes in the series of monologues going under the title of Barnes People. Again the “action” takes place in the form of an interview on an empty stage with the lead character, Leslie Bray, who has been a footman working at Buckingham Palace for thirty years and has in that time risen from humble beginnings as third door opener to the heady heights of first door opener! A lifetime of keeping secrets, putting up with poor pay for the social prestige and privilege of working in the Royal Household and knowing that the role involves upholding the dignity of the Crown at all times. We are given numerous insights into what goes on behind the scenes, the characters which are introduced from both upstairs and downstairs, what is needed to make a success ...
Barnes’ People: Billy & Me – Perfectly Normal Productions
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Barnes’ People: Billy & Me – Perfectly Normal Productions

This is a piece written by Peter Barnes, one in a series of monologues going under the title of Barnes People. The lead character of Michael Jennings in this is taken by probably the best impressionist in the country at the moment, Jon Culshaw, and relies less on his impressionist skills and more on his taking on the role of a ventriloquist. Set on the stage of an empty theatre, the “cast” consists of Culshaw and four of his puppets; the Billy of the title, the Major, Aunt Agnes and Uncle O’Pat, all voiced by Culshaw making use of his myriad voices. The characters of the different puppets are well developed as the narrative proceeds, as is the complex relationship between the puppeteer and his dummies, in fact you begin to wonder who is manipulating who? Are they really 2 sides of the sam...
Barnes’ People: Rosa – Perfectly Normal Productions
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Barnes’ People: Rosa – Perfectly Normal Productions

Dr Rosa Hamilton is a specialist in geriatrics. Sitting in her office dictating into a voice recorder, she is charged with assessing the elderly for council residential care. She's overworked, jaded after 20 years of trying to make a difference, frustrated by a system of what she sees as institutionalised injustice against the "undeserving poor" of London's East End. Yet her professionalism constrains her to continue referring elderly people to care homes that they believe will be an improvement on the conditions they are living in and remove the burden on their families. But Rosa recognises that the care homes are simply "waiting rooms for death", rather than the havens her patients expect. Rosa is a desperate, totally believable character full of self-doubt. She fears that, over the yea...
Barnes’ People: Losing Myself – Perfectly Normal Productions
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Barnes’ People: Losing Myself – Perfectly Normal Productions

Adams is a man who feels he has lost everything, himself, his faith, his hope. He sits on a bench in a dilapidated cemetery that is about to be redeveloped, contemplating his life and chatting to the deceased Maurice as he tries to come to terms with who he has become. He used to be a trusted and dedicated doctor but, somewhere along the way, he realised that his ability to care was a sham and his concern for others was condescension. So he walked away from that life and became a cemetery attendant. This is a play about guilt and self-judgement, loss and rediscovery. The vastly under-rated Matthew Kelly is wonderful as the introspective Adams.  He's haggard but still smartly dressed, a man who "never thought there was anything serious enough in the world to care about." In talking...