Monday, July 15

Tag: Coronet Theatre

The Beckett Trilogy – Coronet Theatre
London

The Beckett Trilogy – Coronet Theatre

How much Beckett is too much Beckett? For performer and producer Conor Lovett it seems the limit may not exist. His prodigious memory and inexhaustible articulation are well displayed in this production of three plays from the novels Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable all written by Samuel Beckett. Alone on stage but very much confederate with a captive audience eager to absorb what they can from his nearly three-hour monologue, Lovett is tremendously impressive and knows it too. Directed and designed by Judy Hegarty Lovett, his conspirator in Gare St Lazare Ireland, a touring production company specializing in “presentations” of Beckett’s various works. The style of this production is extremely presentational and clearly preoccupied with faithful interpretation of the great...
Jean-Michel Bernard Plays Lalo Schifrin – Coronet Theatre
London

Jean-Michel Bernard Plays Lalo Schifrin – Coronet Theatre

Acclaimed French pianist and composer Jean-Michel Bernard is best known for writing, performing, and scoring for films such as Hugo and Be Kind Rewind. But in his second of two nights delighting audiences at Notting Hill’s Coronet Theatre, Bernard played tribute to another icon of the genre, Lalo Schifrin. Bernard delicately took us along a journey through Schifrin’s music, as well as other compositions inspired by his artistry, for an evening that highlighted the inimitable power of music to transport us to another time and place entirely. Accompanied by nothing but his piano, simple lighting and an adorable picture of his beloved chihuahua Onion, Bernard had an astutely commanding presence in the characterful space, and his effortless mastery of his instrument was bewitching. ...
GOOD-BYE – Coronet Theatre
London

GOOD-BYE – Coronet Theatre

A sizzling, poetic piece from Japanese theatre company, Chiten Theatre, weaves snapshots of Osamu Dazai’s life and literature together. The rhythmically acute cast form characters sat at a bar in Tokyo. As they swig their drinks, they build the tension as Dazai nears his impending suicide. A beautifully choreographed sequence sees the characters popping and pulsing, drawing out “Good bye”, a syllable per person. Slowly, this morphs into the main body of the show, which externalises Dazai’s emotional journey, exploring the notions of living and dying, through the particular nihilistic post-war lens. The cast embody characters from Dazai’s life, his stories, and also his own voice. The narrative, elegant in its simplicity, conveyed an intense longing and desire to understand life ...
Lemn Sissay – Poetry Club at the Coronet Theatre
London

Lemn Sissay – Poetry Club at the Coronet Theatre

In 2016, I shared a green room with Lemn Sissay. We were both guests on BBC 2’s Newsnight. I’d been roped in at the last minute to discuss ‘bisexual erasure’. Sissay was on the show to highlight National Poetry Day and to mark the occasion, he delivered a blistering and hypnotic performance of ‘Architecture’. It’s a poem about awesome potential, chaos and evolution. Look it up YouTube. One minute and nineteen seconds that will leave you breathless. To be honest, I was more excited about being in a room with this exceptional poet, than being on live television or getting grilled by Evan Davis. Lemn Sissay is a BAFTA-nominated, award-winning one-man dynamo. He’s written collections of poetry and plays, while his memoir My Name Is Why was a number one Sunday Times bestseller. His work ...
Le Petit Chaperon Rouge – Coronet Theatre
London

Le Petit Chaperon Rouge – Coronet Theatre

Adapting a world-renowned children’s tale for the stage is never an easy task, for one must find a judicious balance between the source text’s reliance on the reader’s imagination and the multisensorial viewpoints afforded by live action. For French playwright and director Joël Pommerat, this isn’t a new challenge. His new interpretation of his 2006 play for children ‘Le Petit Chaperon Rouge’ (Little Red Riding Hood) premiered for UK audiences at the Coronet Theatre on 17th November 2021. This was the first in a trilogy of fairy tales that have been adapted by Pommerat for the stage, having previously directed ‘Pinnochio’ in 2008 and ‘Cendrillon’ (Cindrella) in 2011. With minimal stage design and measured performances by the ensemble of performers, Pommerat’s treatment brings forth a dark...