Wednesday, September 28

Tag: Charles Flint

Saving Britney: Prologue – Old Red Lion Theatre
REVIEWS

Saving Britney: Prologue – Old Red Lion Theatre

Hot on the heels of the recent television documentary Framing Britney Spears, this collaboration from Fake Escape and the Old Red Lion Theatre is a prologue for a live show opening in the Islington space in mid-May. It opens with a shadow puppet introduction which made me think back to the Barbie dolls which populated the film Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story (1988), although the words were borrowing heavily from Romeo and Juliet. This tells, very quickly, the story of the rise of Britney Spears from a child artist to a woman who is denied her financial and professional independence. As a one-woman show, Saving Britney: Prologue focuses on Shereen Roushbaiani as Jean, a moderator on a Britney Fan Group. She is around thirty-years old, seems to populate a room full of Britney mem...
Fake Escape in association with The Old Red Lion Theatre present SAVING BRITNEY: Prologue
NEWS

Fake Escape in association with The Old Red Lion Theatre present SAVING BRITNEY: Prologue

Fake Escape in association with The Old Red Lion Theatre present SAVING BRITNEY: Prologue, a digital short written by David Shopland with Shereen Roushbaiani Streaming exclusively online 5th – 25th April 2021 It's Jean, B*tch. A few months ago, Britney Spears superfan Jean was ready to tell the world her story live from the Old Red Lion Theatre in the heart of Islington... until the government, in the words of Noughties boyband Blue, 'got the city on Lockdown.’ Undeterred by another pandemic body-blow, Jean has agreed to host a very special and exclusive Facebook Live session only available digitally via the Old Red Lion Theatre website. Join her as she attempts to make sense of the pop princess in the age of conservatorship, cyberbullying and the #MeToo movement. Co-devised b...
December – Old Red Lion Theatre
London

December – Old Red Lion Theatre

Bag of Beard Collective in conjunction with ORL Theatre serves up this quirky, sometimes sinister but ultimately highly enjoyable show written and directed by ORL artistic director Alexander Knott. The play is basically another take on the Dickens classic A Christmas Carol but instead of Scrooge taking centre stage, Knott cleverly focuses on the ever put upon and downtrodden Bob Cratchit (Ryan Hutton). Knott imagines him taking a journey to possible futures ahead, through encounters with vagabonds, spirits and ghosts. For fans of the Dicken’s characters there is definitely some fun to be had in this inventive adaptation and even though it has its very dark and sometimes quite surreal moments (think disco sparkle flairs, Bowies Fashion and Cuban heels) you cannot deny the sheer energ...