Tuesday, November 29

Tag: Sky Arts

The London Climate Festival ‘Songs for Nature’ – Sky Arts
REVIEWS

The London Climate Festival ‘Songs for Nature’ – Sky Arts

The London Climate Festivals ‘Songs for Nature’ was filmed at the stunning London Coliseum, the largest theatre in the West End and surrounding areas over three days with the crucial intention of raising awareness of climate change. It was free to watch on Sky Arts on 22nd April or ‘Earth Day’. Directed by Dominic Dromgoole and Bill Buckhurst, it featured an eclectic array of acts, from comedian Rob Brydon to Nathan Evans (of the recent Sea Shanty fame). It also included dance and orchestra and of course an essential thread of activists throughout, with contributions from the likes of Cool Earths Dr Hannah Peck and also Born Frees Youth Ambassador, a very passionate Bella Lack. The concert opened to an introduction by David Suchet. In some ways he almost looked lost as he stood alon...
Hymn – Sky Arts at Almeida Theatre
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Hymn – Sky Arts at Almeida Theatre

Lolita Chakrabarti’s thoughtful new play ‘Hymn’ was conceived with a live audience in mind. However, Blanche McIntyre’s recent production filmed under COVID-safe, socially distanced conditions at the Almeida Theatre, initially live-streamed and then shown this weekend on Sky Arts works perfectly in communicating the relationship between two men, Gill (Adrian Lister) and Benny (Danny Sapani). The play centres only on Gill and Benny, and opens with the funeral of Gill’s Father, Gus. Gill delivers the eulogy. Benny is also at the funeral. The two men meet, not at all by chance, and even though they are from vastly different social backgrounds, with different education and different prospects, this opens a course of events that draw the two into what becomes a powerful and emotionally char...
Romeo & Juliet – The National Theatre
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Romeo & Juliet – The National Theatre

Faint heart never won fair lady, so it is only right that under the direction of Simon Goodwin, the National Theatre, following in the wake of Zeffirelli’s 1968 tour de force and Luhrmann’s wonderful 1996 translation, have boldly reimagined Shakespeare’s classic tale of love to serve up a Romeo & Juliet fit for the 21st Century. Filmed over seventeen days in an empty Lyttelton Theatre, the contrast between scene and unseen spaces offers the perfect parallel for a play which whilst on the surface is a love story, at its heart is riddled with tension, twists, and turns. The Prince (an assured Adrian Lester) provides the authoritative voice of calm and reason after Tybalt (David Judge) and Benvolio (Shubham Saraf) clash before the respective heads of their families, Lord and Lady C...