Thursday, May 23

Tag: Ryan Day

Now I See – Stratford East
London

Now I See – Stratford East

In a unique fusion of movement, music and text, “Now, I See” takes audiences on a vibrant, emotional journey through the joys and pains of being black and male in contemporary Britain. Directed, choreographed and written by Lanre Malaolu, this 130-min nugget offers a luscious dive into male consciousness and the culture that shapes childhood adventures and a man’s ability to choose his narrative later in life. Fans of Suzan-Lori Parks’ “Topdog/Underdog” should feel right at home. The story centres on three brothers, and the aftermath of the middle one’s death, Adeyeye, from sickle cell disease. His passing leaves big brother Kieron and youngest brother Dayo grappling with their grief and searching for a way forward. History, big and small, has not been kind to either and the brothers’ ...
The Boy at the Back of the Class – Sheffield Lyceum
Yorkshire & Humber

The Boy at the Back of the Class – Sheffield Lyceum

Sheffield Lyceum opened its doors and its generational spanning heart to the adaptation of Onjali Q. Rauf’s well known and much loved book A Boy at the Back of the Class. Adapter Nick Ahad’s does not disappoint in his stage version, retaining all the wit, the power of a collective sense of humanity and the eternal hope we all deserve to experience. Monique Touko as Director strives to paint a desired world stating, ‘May this play push for further actions of kindness, promote equality and depict a world where people are seen as people’. Aimed at children, teachers and parents alike this production is a full, dynamic and impactful theatrical experience bringing the characters and their story to life. The set and costume design by Lily Arnold creates the backdrop of a school setting with ...
The Lemon Table – HOME, Manchester
North West

The Lemon Table – HOME, Manchester

Have you ever been to a concert or to the theatre and had the overwhelming urge to tap the person in front of you on the shoulder to ask them if they could possibly stop talking, or put their phone away, or just cough more quietly? I know I certainly have! And that is where this play opens, with a concert goer doing just that. What follows is an exploration of the behaviour of a man who just wants to be able to enjoy the creativity and brilliance of an orchestra, its soloists and its conductor in peace. He clearly appreciates the performing arts and values being at live events, which is something that I’m quite sure we can all relate to in the new post-pandemic world; but he is also frustrated by the discourteous behaviour of his fellow audience members. However, as the scene unfolds, ...