Sunday, May 19

Tag: Royal Lyceum

The Girls of Slender Means – Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh
Scotland

The Girls of Slender Means – Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh

Directed by Roxana Silbert, "The Girls of Slender Means" follows the lives of five young women living in the May of Teck Club in London during the summer of 1945. Adapted by Gabriel Quigley from Muriel Spark's novel, the play explores the post-war hopes and struggles of the characters as they navigate love, work, and survival in a society torn by war. Romance, fashion, and politics intersect as the girls grapple with uncertainty and cling to their dreams amidst the rubble of the past. The fragmented structure adds depth to the storytelling, inviting audiences to piece together the narrative while reflecting on themes of resilience and the lasting power of hope. Under Silbert's direction, the production shines with its immaculate production design, drawing the audience into a world wher...
Two Sisters – Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh
Scotland

Two Sisters – Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh

Writer David Greig, returns to the stage for the first time since taking the reins as Artistic Director of The Royal Lyceum in 2016, with a whimsical exploration of time, memory, love and self-fulfilment. The title might be a nod to Chekhov, but the setting is closer to home ,a rusting and decrepit caravan park, on the shoreline of the Firth of Forth in the kingdom of Fife. Two thirtysomething sisters, Amy and Emma meet up in Holiday Heaven, the favourite holiday location of their youth. Emma is now a successful lawyer and company director who is just looking for peace and quiet and a space to write, on her own, a last chance of self expression before her first child arrives. Amy, leather clad and tottering about in high heals, is a failed rock star, who has jumped from one idea to the...
Laurel & Hardy – Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh
Scotland

Laurel & Hardy – Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh

Knowledge of our two protagonists – for those of us who had a TV back in the late 60’s/early 70’s - extended to a pair of bumbling incompetents consistently at odds with even the most mundane of situations. Funny, comic, slapstick, every grade of mirth was covered, be it driving a car or attempting some interior decoration, the wince-inducing violence happily hilarious and incidental. In our lofty 9-year-old estimation Tom & Jerry cartoons (the proper ones!) owed a huge debt to Stan and Ollie. But this production delved behind the Saturday morning entertainment, an insight into the lives of Oliver Norvell Hardy and Arthur Stanley Jefferson, successes in their own right prior to becoming the duo the globe knows so well. The austere, bleached (even the pies were bluey-grey) concrete ...