Saturday, May 25

Tag: Richard Baker

Peter Pan Goes gnorW – Edinburgh Playhouse
Scotland

Peter Pan Goes gnorW – Edinburgh Playhouse

Mischief (here working with Kenny Wax Ltd and Stage Presence Ltd) is the multi award-winning company responsible for the very popular The Play That Goes Wrong, and its many conceptual spin-offs. These include the BBC One television series The Goes Wrong Show, Mind Mangler - Member of the Tragic Circle, Magic Goes Wrong, Mischief Movie Night and, of course, this evening's Peter Pan Goes Wrong, which was directed by Adam Meggido, with help from Associate Director Fred Gray. Like many of their shows, the concept is as complicated as the title. The ‘Cornley Drama Society’ Jake Burgum (Trevor the Stage Manager ), Jean-Luke Worrell (Francis the Narrator), Ciara Morris (Sandra / Wendy), Theo Toksvig-Stewart (Max / Michael), Clark Devlin (Dennis / John), Jamie Birkett (Annie / Tinkerbell), Gar...
Talking Gods III: Pygmalion – Arrows & Traps Theatre
REVIEWS

Talking Gods III: Pygmalion – Arrows & Traps Theatre

The third episode of Talking Gods from Arrows & Traps Theatre, tells the story of Pygmalion. Written and directed by Ross McGregor, this is a modern retelling of the story of a man who falls in love with his own creation. Pygmalion (Edward Spence) is a reclusive, award-winning game designer, who spends most of his time with Ratbag (Richard Baker), his sentient but virtual assistant. Editing his latest game, it quickly becomes clear that he is a perfectionist. Many people do reach out to him, including numerous nymphs sending over dating profiles and his mother trying to establish regular contact, but Pygmalion is determined to avoid any difficult conversations or conflict, and so responds by deleting the many messages he is left and ignoring news broadcasts. He does watch old vi...
Pirates of Penzance – Palace Theatre
London

Pirates of Penzance – Palace Theatre

Of all Gilbert and Sullivan's works, Pirates of Penzance is probably the best known and one of their most popular, having been a hit since it first opened in New York in December 1879. Since then, it has been interpreted and re-interpreted - and Sasha Regan 's award-winning production is one of the very best. The "men playing women" trope has, of course, been around for many centuries, in Shakespeare and in panto. It depends on the talent of the actors to make the conceit work.  And work it does, the all-male cast adding an additional layer of whimsy to what is already a marvellously funny operetta. The story hinges on its subtitle "The Slave Of Duty".  After a miscommunication leads young Frederic to be indentured to the dastardly Pirates of Penzance, he delights in his free...