Monday, May 20

Tag: Physical Fest

Memoria – Tmesis Theatre at Albert Walker Hall at the Linacre Methodist Mission
North West

Memoria – Tmesis Theatre at Albert Walker Hall at the Linacre Methodist Mission

Memoria, created by Tmesis Theatre and directed by Elinor Randle, takes us on a journey of memory and nostalgia in this immersive, physical piece set in the Albert Walker Hall at the Linacre Methodist Mission, much influenced by the many real stories of people whose lives were spent in this very building and whose accompanying voices and imagery are further represented through the physical medium of cast and ensemble, and the addition of text from David Whyte’s Consolations. These experiences are further explored by the notion that perhaps all epochs live and breath in parallel, that spaces and minds can hold imprints of all that has gone before, influencing the future. Equally, where we don’t remember, we always have our imagination, and this is where the piece spectacularly unfolds a...
Trees: An Audio Journey – Physical Fest
REVIEWS

Trees: An Audio Journey – Physical Fest

Jamie Wood’s Trees: An Audio Journey combines a detailed and personal memoir of a homemade pilgrimage with a guided mindful walk and a spiritual journey of self-discovery. Recorded by Wood on a ten day walk from Coventry in Warwickshire to Treherbert in South Wales, it is recommended that you listen to the piece while taking your own walk outside and reconnecting with your own roots as Wood did. Wood’s voice is very soothing from the opening of the piece and the background noises of the recording blend beautifully with those around you. Wood encourages you to be curious and notice things you haven’t noticed before. The chorus of sounds allow you to get lost in the experience. Wood’s journey is one which his grandparents undertook when they were younger and he scatters their ashes at...
Vigil – Physical Fest
REVIEWS

Vigil – Physical Fest

Mechanimal’s Vigil, created and performed by Tom Bailey, with movement direction by Philippa Hambly, is a desperate and poignant illustration of the devastating effects of climate change on animal and plant life endangered as a result of both that and other environmental concerns. Opening in a small wooded area, Bailey walks around with a glass box which he slowly fills with twigs from the ground, some of which are too big to fit into the small confines of the box, indicating from the start that what we are going to see will feel overwhelming in many ways. Moving into a plain room with a white screen, Bailey sits on his box, seemingly full of foliage, when the names of plants and animals on the red list, those at highest risk of extinction begin flashing up on the screen. Bailey wat...