Thursday, May 30

Tag: Louisa May Alcott

Little Women – HOME, Manchester
North West

Little Women – HOME, Manchester

Christmas is not an easy time for theatre programmers. The demand is there, from young and old, but so is the competition. Eschewing the traditional panto, the full-scale musical and the seasonal farce, HOME has instead opted to revive Anne-Marie Casey’s adaptation of the classic novel Little Women. It is a very smart decision. First performed last summer, this production is like a stage version of the very best Sunday afternoon TV drama. It is totally and utterly charming from the very first second. Louisa May Alcott’s semi-autobiographical novel has truly stood the test of time and been adapted countless times and ways since the 1860s. This version is a relatively faithful, if stripped back, affair which smartly refreshes the storytelling. At the height of the American Civil...
Figs in Wigs: Little Wimmin – Southbank Centre
London

Figs in Wigs: Little Wimmin – Southbank Centre

Pitched somewhere between anarchic performance art and chaotic high-concept mockery of theatrical and literary analysis, the Figs in Wigs' satirical adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" veers from Greek chorus, avant-garde dance to groan-ful puns and visual humour. Alcott's work, given an unnecessarily deep and pretentious analysis of the text can, the Figs suggest with tongues stuck firmly in cheeks, be linked to climate change, astrology, the future of humankind and the patriarchy.  And cocktails.  The five Figs in Wigs (Alice Roots, Sarah Moore, Suzanna Hurst, Rachel Gammon and Rachel Porter), rounding out the Southbank's Women of the World Festival in recognition of International Women's Day, give the show their all in their various roles, with impeccable chor...
Little Women The Musical – Park Theatre
London

Little Women The Musical – Park Theatre

Little Women, Louisa May Alcott’s semi-autobiographical tale has been brought to life in this charming musical adaptation. The show first opened on Broadway in 2005, starring Sutton Foster and has been revived by Bronagh Lagan’s adaptation at the Park Theatre in London. The show stays somewhat faithful to the novel, following the lives of the four March sisters, Jo (Lydia White), Meg (Hana Ichijo), Beth (Anastasia Martin) and Amy (Mary Moore) who live in Massachusetts with their mother whilst their father is away as a chaplain during the Civil War. Alcott’s narrative, with all its nuances and details, is quite a difficult story to replicate especially in a musical structure, which emerges in this adaptation. Designed by Nik Corrall, the set was stripped down and simple, yet worked w...