Tuesday, February 7

Tag: Ian Ashpitel

Eric & Ern – Floral Pavilion
North West

Eric & Ern – Floral Pavilion

How do you replicate the diamond duo of Morecombe and Wise, held in Britain’s comedy consciousness with an abundance of affection? Can the captivating chemistry between them ever be replicated? Watching actors Jonty Stephens and Ian Ashpitel on stage, you’d be forgiven for thinking you’re in a time-warp! They are exceptionally uncanny. Playing all the right notes in the right order, Eric & Ern manages to imitate the inimitable. It is unmissable. Not only do they look incredibly convincing as the renowned double-act, their mannerisms and timing mesh together to create a live show that captures the essence of Morecombe and Wise’s magic – nothing is lost. It is a true feat of necromancy. With high expectations from fans and newbies alike, we’re greeted by Stephens and Ashpitel open...
Eric and Ern – The Lowry
North West

Eric and Ern – The Lowry

Anytime there is a poll on the public’s favourite comedy act, or a look back at the TV of yesteryear, one double act will feature, without fail – Morecambe and Wise. Icons of their era, they’ve left a legacy of classic comedy that is adored to this day. So, whilst modern-day comedians may attempt to push boundaries with their material, it’s a brave soul that attempts to re-visit the most-loved sketches of these titans of British comedy. Ian Ashpitel (as Ernie) and Jonty Stephens (as Eric) are those souls, having developed tonight’s variety show from their stage play of the duo’s enduring partnership. But it is quickly obvious that even the most die-hard fans will be breathing a big sigh of relief that the material is in very safe, and very funny hands. Soaking the audience with a...
Eric & Ern – Festival Theatre, Edinburgh
Scotland

Eric & Ern – Festival Theatre, Edinburgh

It was difficult to suppress a chuckle simply taking in the set. That sofa, for those of us of a certain vintage, the telephone (Daddy, what were they for in the olden days?) and… The Bed! With no sign of a kitchen one feared – correctly as it turned out – that this would be free of pop-up toast routines. Of Des O’Connor mentions, famous catchphrases and legendary sketches it was not. Never mind how ‘of its era’ it was (20 million+ viewers for the Christmas Specials in 1977 and 1978), this production underlined how enduring the scripts have proved. As has - faithfully captured by Jonty Stephens (Eric) and Ian Ashpitel (Ern) - the stagecraft, timing and theatricality necessary to execute them. In less safe hands a quip about watching a three-foot high person swallow a four-foot sword might...