Thursday, May 30

Tag: Donmar Warehouse

Next To Normal – Donmar Warehouse
London

Next To Normal – Donmar Warehouse

Cult favourite ‘Next To Normal’ has taken 15 years to reach our shores, and while it’s relatively unknown over here, it arrives on the back of a wave of adoration from its devoted fanbase, not to mention the critical acclaim (Tony Awards a Pulitzer, no less).  The show comes from the mind of composer Tom Kitts, who along with Brian Yorkey (book and lyrics), tells a story of a family dealing with a crippling mental health problem which has governed their lives for the best part of 2 decades. News of the show’s UK premiere was met with massive excitement, with its limited run selling incredibly well.  But was it worth the wait? Wife and mother Diane Goodman (Caissie Levy) is struggling with bi-ploar disorder, and the toll it's taking on her family, daughter Natalie (Eleanor Wor...
When Winston Went to War with the Wireless – Donmar Warehouse
London

When Winston Went to War with the Wireless – Donmar Warehouse

Just like the BBC, which is the subject of this new play by Jack Thorne, both inform and entertain. It is set in the early days of the general strike in 1926 when the British Broadcasting Company, as it was then known, was in its formative days under the leadership of the redoubtable John Reith. Since the strike led to the temporary closure of all the print media, this provided a golden opportunity for the new broadcaster to become a premier news channel. This brought it into conflict with the government's own alternative press media, the British Gazette, overseen by Winston Churchill, then Chancellor of the Exchequer. Reith, played by Stephen Campbell Moore, is the central character of the play. He struggles both with trying to position the new company as an impartial media ...
Private Lives – Donmar Warehouse
London

Private Lives – Donmar Warehouse

Michael Longhurst's revival of Noel Coward's classic play downplays the lightness and wit of Coward's dialogue and emphasises the violence of the relationship between the two main characters. Elliott and Amanda. The plot is familiar: two honeymooning couples happen to occupy adjoining balconies in their seaside resort, and unfortunately one of the members of each of the couples used to be married to the other. When they discover this and overcome their initial shock and horror, they realise that their underlying love for each other is much stronger than they have for the nonentities whom they have recently married. The first scene takes place on the two balconies and the rest of the play takes place in a Paris apartment, to which Elliott and Amanda have escaped from their new spouse...
A Doll’s House Part 2 – Donmar Warehouse
London

A Doll’s House Part 2 – Donmar Warehouse

A dark house lifts off the stage to reveal its interior, and we are drawn into the intimate space. The story follows on from Ibsen’s classic, presenting their world fifteen years later. Nora has found purpose as a famous writer under a pseudonym but returns home to settle pressing legal matters. The set designed by Rae Smith has a cool, clinical feel like it hasn’t been lived in as none of the characters are truly settled and its initial state is mysterious and bleak, like it holds a chamber of secrets. Noma Dumezweni’s Nora is controlled and meticulously crafted. With a fierce moral code and ideals, she is earthy and wise yet there is something indefinable about her. As Nora’s interacts with the other characters, she is fluid and playful yet grounded by her unswerving principles. ...
Henry V – Donmar Warehouse
REVIEWS

Henry V – Donmar Warehouse

Shakespeare’s wartime history is transported to the modern day in Max Webster's newest production for the Donmar Warehouse, this time screen through National Theatre Live. For those unfamiliar with the plot: after an insult from the French Dauphin, King Henry V of England invades France to claim the throne he believes should be his. Henry stops an assassination plot, rouses troops with powerful rhetoric, and wins battles when the odds are stacked against England. In the end, he marries the Princess of France, linking the two nations. Shakespeare’s original production was set around 1599 and contained all the ingredients to make it a smash hit at the royal court. This production poignantly communicates the ease with which Shakespeare can seemingly be transplanted to perhaps any time per...
Constellations – Donmar Warehouse
London

Constellations – Donmar Warehouse

“We’ve effectively asked the same question twice and come up with two completely different answers” says Marianne… and there, in a nutshell, is the essence of this beautiful play by Nick Payne. Constellations tells the journey of a relationship, but it is not told in order from start to finish. Instead, you see multiple possibilities for each conversation as the story unfolds, highlighting the various key points as Roland and Marianne meet and fall in love. Along the way it makes you question life’s purpose, and the control you think you have over your own situation. The writing is clever, and full of nuance; fully realised by the careful direction of Michael Longhurst. It would be easy for a production like this to become repetitive and slow, but the cast and creative teams have wo...
Love and Other Acts of Violence – Donmar Warehouse
London

Love and Other Acts of Violence – Donmar Warehouse

Love and Other Acts of Violence delivers what it promises. As a subversive story of a couple who meet by chance and become embroiled in a dysfunctional relationship, it could be relatable to many for a multitude of reasons – none of which are very happy. The play draws on the history of the anti-Jewish violence in Poland from 1944-46, right at the end of World War 2, and examines the concept of inherited trauma. Do we feel the pain of the tragedies that befell our grandparents, and how does this influence us and our attitudes towards others- especially those who are perhaps descended from those that would have been opposing our ancestors? It’s an important question; one that has been right at the forefront of political and cultural discussions of late. But should any person be subjecte...
The Lawrence Batley Theatre announces Summer season
NEWS

The Lawrence Batley Theatre announces Summer season

The Lawrence Batley Theatre has announced that live entertainment will return to the venue from Monday 7th June with a season of socially distanced and outdoor performances. The West-Yorkshire theatre, which is currently operating a beer garden with live outdoor music in its Courtyard space, will open its summer season with the Donmar Warehouse installation, Blindness as part of its seven venue UK tour. Other season highlights include; performances by Huddersfield based theatre company Dick & Lottie with an Alan Ayckbourn double bill titled Farcicals, Charles Court Opera present the complete works of Gilbert & Sullivan in 75 minutes, multi-award winning theatre company Mikron showcase two brand-new shows, A Dog’s Tale and Atalanta Forever, ThickSkin take to the streets of Hu...